Health Care Reform Event at L.A. Care Health Plan on March 21, 2012

IABC-LA presented a highly informative panel of communication experts to discuss “Communicating Complex Change: Health Care Reform” on March 21, 2012 at event program sponsor L.A. Care Health Plan’s headquarters.  Cheryl Farrell, Board Member of IABC-LA, moderated this invaluable panel session to share how local health care professionals are communicating the complex changes of health care reform to various audiences (Event Podcast).

The distinguished panel included Patricia Clarey, Senior VP, Chief Regulatory and External Relations Officer of Health Net ;  John Merryman, Senior Director, Marketing/PR of South Bay Family Health Care; Ronald Owens, Director, Corporate Communications of Kaiser Permanente Southern California; Elena Stern, Communications and Marketing Director of L.A. Care Health Plan; and Cheryl Fields Tyler, Owner and CEO of Blue Beyond Consulting. The panel informed our chapter members how health care reform is being received and integrated by leading health care companies in Southern California (listen to the event podcast).

The panel discussion after a quick buffet dinner covered topics such as how this legislation is an extraordinary opportunity for innovation within the health care system as well as communications, how the new competitive environment created by mandating state-based Exchanges on individual policies will create positive benefits for consumers, and how do communicators break through to its new and existing audiences (we learned about the role and importance of Spanish-speaking Promotoras!)

So many advances have been made towards creating a communications system that is much more efficient than yesteryear including revolutionary a $5 billion electronic computerized patient records system as opposed to handwritten files and notes as discussed by Ron Owens of Kaiser Permanente.  Doctors are required to learn this system so a patient can be treated across states with tremendous efficiency.

Healthcare communications consultant Cheryl Fields Tyler emphasized the extraordinary opportunity for innovation that comes with such far-reaching legislature and how this is a game-changer for U.S. business overall.  She also emphasized the need for communicators to embrace and support the new legislation positively to create better understanding and trust between employers and employees.  Employees trust face-to-face meetings with direct managers.

Pat Clarey of Health Net has served as chief of staff to both former California governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Pete Wilson, with current Health Net responsibilities for federal and state regulatory, legislative and compliance issues.  Pat discussed the new legislative concept of “guaranteed issue” for individuals seeking individual insurance policies through the reform’s American Health Benefit Exchanges, which has not been offered in the current California landscape if an individual had a pre-existing condition such as asthma.

John Merryman of South Bay Family Health Care noted the importance of funders for newly established programs.  In his view “money follows money” and the health care reform will shift how funding funnels through non-profits as well as private health care companies.

Elena Stern of event sponsor L.A. Health Care Plan enlightened us on how significant the role and use of a Promotora, a female Spanish-speaking healthcare advocate, is to underserved communities needing an array of healthcare and healthcare related services.

Finally, audience participants engaged in a Q&A with more information shed on topics such as how doctors are receiving all of this new legislation.

Big thanks to “Communicating Complex Change: Health Care Reform” event committee including IABC-LA members Cheryl Farrell, Paromita Ghosh, Adam Kevorkian, T.J. Stevko and Cimone Farrell.  Bill Spaniel served as podcast engineer while Ed Carreon of provided photography.

The chapter also kindly thanks event sponsor L.A. Health Care Plan for its sponsorship and use of its downtown headquarters facilities.

Please click here to listen to the event podcast.


“The Care and Feeding of Your Network” Event – Il Fornaio on 2-29-12

IABC-LA Members participated in an engaging, interactive presentation entitled “The Care and Feeding of Your Network” at Il Fornaio in Manhattan Beach on 2-29-12.  Are you an introvert or an extrovert when making connections at specific events?  When you hear the phrase “networking event” do you dismiss the whole concept as too much smiling-and-business-card-exchange work? Are you one of the 99% of people who are full of …. (rhymes with “it”!) when it comes to follow-through according to author and expert connector Peter Shankman?

Presenters and L.A. Chapter Board Members Cheryl Farrell, Chris Cabrera, Paula Cassin and Christie Ly presented valuable statistics, and tips on much deeper networking practices, with interactive exercises on ice breakers, elevator pitches, connecting, and the importance of follow-up! The evening allowed extrovert and introvert members to practice and engage with each other going beyond status-quo networking while getting to know one another’s expertise and even passions.  Lots of buzz in the warm and toasty Il Fornaio room as new conversations and new connections were being made.

Cheryl Farrell of Cheryl Farrell Communications presented tips for panic-free interactions with “strangers”.  Cheryl cited Myers-Briggs research on introverts vs. extroverts behavior as being misunderstood.  Myers-Briggs states what types of people, activities and events gives you energy determines introvert and extrovert status.  Many of us may be a blend depending on activities.  Cheryl discussed how we may test ice breakers in safe places, be well read with conversational topics and reframe initial introductions with less “me focus” and more outward focus in an “exchange of attention.”

Chris Cabrera engaged members on the subject of elevator pitches.  Elevator pitches need to be crisp and to the point, compelling with an attention-grabbing phrase and spoken with confidence.  We congratulated new member Betty Henry who tried her elevator pitch out for the first time in front of the group, and Charlotte Lassos who bravely demonstrated her elevator pitch.  The elevator pitch concept sounds easier than it looks, even for professional communicators, yet is an essential component of deeper networking.

Paula Cassin discussed connecting vs. standard business-card-exchange networking.  Truly connecting involves not only connecting to a new contact, yet also who you may be able to connect that person to who may need a specific resource.  By removing the expectation that a new contact must do something for you immediately if you do something for them right now allows for a longer-term payoff and certainly a more authentic connection.  During one interactive exercise, Paula asked us to write down 1) our passion, 2) something we are looking for right now, and 3) our expertise…and then engage and connect to others in the room looking for intersecting interests and needs, professionally and personally.

And finally, Christie Ly discussed the importance of follow-through, which according to author and expert networker, Peter Shankman, is a serious faux-pas for most networking people in his article “Why Most People Are Full of S…, and How Not to Be One of Them.” We all want to be thought of as “the nice guy” yet follow-through is where the other 1% lives.  Follow-through takes work yet can be a huge pay-off. Christie discussed how important it is to help others make connections if you mentioned a contact or resource.  To support the follow-through ideal, IABC-LA member Anna Lefter told of her early work experience with PR pro Carl Terzian, who wrote handwritten notes after initial introductions and kept a journal on contacts so he could remember children’s names, interests, and other professional and personal facts.

We were delighted to welcome new chapter members Deborah Hudson of Zurich Insurance and Betty Henry, while seeing participants Chris Keough of Belkin, Anna Lefter, Charlotte Lassos, Anne Giblin, Allison Mullin, Kerry Bonner, and former chapter president Jamie Lipson who was a terrific sport in revealing her favorite guilty-pleasure t.v. show “The Bachelor”!

Big thanks to presenters Cheryl Farrell, host and presenter Chris Cabrera, Paula Cassin and Christie Ly with event assistance from the awesome Cimone Farrell.  We also appreciated the roaring fireplace and the calamari hors d’oeuvres.  Great connections were made by all!

Murder Mystery Holiday Luncheon 2010


IABC-LA’s annual holiday teas have been truly lovely and held in beautiful tearooms over the last few years…however, there was a chalk mark drawn around the still body of the tea concept this year in favor of something entirely newand unique: A Holiday Murder Mystery Luncheon! 

How well does a Murder Mystery go with the holidays? Only ZorroClaus, a wisecracking “LAPD detective” and crime-solving IABC members them-elves could participate in such twists and turns at The Porterhouse Bistro in Beverly Hills on December 11, 2010.  And yes, the demise of some “victims” was brought on by our own members (see video attached).  Who was involved and why?  Besides inspired event coordination by Myra Jolivet (who brought up the idea originally), with assistance by Christie Ly and Christopher Cabrera, a secret source supplied information about some chapter members to the host of the interactive Murder Mystery to create intrigue, heavy laughs, red herrings and fun.

The L.A. Chapter maintained its commitment and passion to communications as bodies fell from being “shot”, “stabbed” or “poisoned.”  Chapter member Bill Spaniel donned his baseball caps in Sherlock Holmes style and used his delightful wit as one of the crime-solvers. Bill also reminded us of the upcoming judging opportunities for The Gold Quill Awards.  Rebecca Mikkelsen and chapter President, Paula Cassin, reiterated how much we learn from the entries in participating as a Gold Quill Judge…with terrific networking opportunities professionally and personally. (Rebecca and I have become wonderful friends since pairing up as Gold Quill judging partners last January.  I later joined Rebecca’s social media team for the chapter this year.)  Rebecca and Stephen Cassin also participated kindly as our mystery host threw questions at us about what we know about these two possible suspects. 

We enjoyed our four-course luncheon of gourmet food and wine while catching up with members. Later, Julie Fornaro, our new website’s mastermind, read from a suspiciously-dropped business card “Hits-R-Us” while a wisecracking “LAPD detective” threaded the mounting clues throughout the interactive plot… including a Santa hat with a sword poked through a note from “ZorroClaus.”  Otherwise hard-working Chapter President Paula Cassin revealed herself as “ZorroClaus” …and Keeping Up with the Kardashians..well, sort of…having much fun distributing “stolen” cash and presents.  Kerry Bonner sported her bright and cheery red jacket during the event’s pre-luncheon cocktails…only to “wear a knife” and create some great laughs during her “death scene.” Bill Spaniel, David Schmidt, Gail Herring, Chris Cabrera and Stephen Cassin were terrific sports against the detective’s banter. Chapter crime-solvers also included Mauria McPoland, Marsha Webster, Louvenia Austin, Elodie Khavarani , Susan Delgadillo and Pamela Corante-Hansen…all suspects until proven innocent. Cheryl Farrell had some serious explaining to do…which led to some hilarious communications and “battle scene” antics between the detective and Cheryl.  

Congrats to Ariela Iringan and Briana Sharp who were the closest in figuring out the details, motives and storyline when everyone paired up to solve the crimes.  Our host proclaimed the rest of us as not-yet-detective-ready in our “pathetic” attempts to solve the motives behind the secrets.  We enjoy solving communications issues…or bad puns like “Nobody Does It Deader.”

Chris Cabrera of Southern California Edison and Paula Cassin, presented a $500 donation check to our chapter’s guest, Gina Quesenberry, Librarian at the El Monte Library in support of the El Monte Library’s programs that reach children, teens and adults.  We were delighted to have Gina take part in our mystery while being a gracious and good-humored recipient toward our chapter’s commitment to supporting our communities.  Chris Cabrera also stated that Southern California Edison is making a donation of 85 books to enhance the library’s materials towards further support.

Warm thanks to Myra Jolivet, Christie Ly, and Chris Cabrera for putting their distinct and creative fingerprints all over this memorable event.  Acting nods to Paula, Kerry and Cheryl…for hilarious comedic “drama” and our thanks again to The Porterhouse Bistro actors and staff who put some holiday crackle into our tongue-in-cheek event.

Post Event Report: Nov 17th, 2010: “Staying Relevant as a Communicator”

November 17, 2010…IABC-LA presented Susan San Martin’s “Staying Relevant as a Communicator.” This event was graciously hosted by Ernst & Young in downtown Los Angeles, and coordinated by our talented chapter member T.J. Stevko. “Who is hiring?” “What skills are in demand?” “How can a communicator showcase his or her special experience?” These questions and much more were addressed by San Martin, Principal, Plan B Communications, a results-driven executive search and consulting firm.

“It’s always dangerous for me to draft a presentation a few days early before the event.” said San Martin. San Martin shared with us her decision to scrap her well-prepared presentation in order to re-tool the entire thing…brainstorming on her dining room table with large sheets of rolled paper connecting boxes and brainstorming notes. And San Martin does get results. Feedback came in from 18 reliable lifelong communications contacts. This global outreach fostered an even more substantive cross-section of answers and suggestions from communications leaders all over the U.S. and the world…including India.

Is the hiring market improving for communicators?

• In absolute numbers, hiring is quiet in the U.S., yet we’re seeing a lot of hiring where business is growing in Asia and Latin America.
• There’s an increase in internal and employee communications communicators
• Re: social media expert hirings: Hire a 20-year employee. They know how to write and how to work through the system of a company.
• Bi-lingual and tri-lingual employees are in demand regarding social media with their ability to switch between cultural environments

What role does social media play in your communications strategies?
• Just knowing how to use FaceBook and LinkedIn does not define you as knowing social media.
• A really strong social media strategy pairs an employee 2-3 years out of school who knows how to connect with bloggers and dig out resources with a more traditional communicator of 20+ years who truly understands how to edit content.
• (One of our favorites!) Question: Do you have a social media strategy? Answer: Do you have a telephone strategy backing up your social media? (Nice!) Too many social media strategies rely on digital relationships without any personal touch.
• For communicators intimidated by social media…social media is a new tool, but not a new skill. Relax…you can do this because you already know how to communicate.
• Audiences do care about the written word, it’s just not accessed the same way.

What career missteps do you see?
• Communicators can be too choosy and too fearful. Get outside of your comfort level. If you’re a specialist, take on communications challenges so you become a generalist.
• Google, Ford, Intel all produce exceptional communications employees. Why? Because the employee does a stint in many different departments, becoming a business person first, a communicator second. Become a business person.
• Don’t forget how to write…grammar, SpellCheck. Print, emails, blogs all count.
• You must tie communications to business results.
• Don’t ramble in interviews. Practice sound bytes.
• STOP TMI!!!! Too much information on an interview or exchange.
• Not enough follow-through. Excitement on a social media project does not replace follow-through.

What smart moves are communicators making?
• Companies look for intangible qualities; sometimes the softer piece of information on a resume can make you stand out…rather than “blaring” it out loud.
• Go above and beyond. It’s about attitude…unexpected opportunities are your friend.
• Use a pay-it-forward mentality. Have a relationship-building focus.
• On an interview, do say “I’ve got initiative” as opposed to “I’m a fast learner”…be prepared to back it up.
• Research the company culture in your job search and understand it first, be honest with yourself if it’s the right culture for you, regardless of the company.
• It’s okay to make a resume 3-4 pages, as long as the information helps you to stand out.
• Look for successful communications organizations who reward good work and punish bad work consistently the same. They talk the talk and walk the walk.
• Develop relationships with subject matter experts.

Overall, Susan encouraged all communicators to get out of our comfort zones, and reassured those with 20 years experience that traditional skills still work in our rapidly changing landscape. Re-aligning relevant talent and skills is challenging…yet very rewarding.

Susan San Martin was a Vice President and Executive Recruiter with The Repovich-Reynolds Group where she conducted mid to senior-level communications and marketing searches. She has partnered with clients such as: SC Johnson, DaVita Inc., Dell Inc., Western Union, The Blackstone Group and many others. Over the last two years, she stepped out on her own to create Plan B Communications, using her 20+ years of diversified communications and marketing experience to become a highly-regarded executive search professional.

We welcomed Susan to join us for the “After Dark” portion of the evening at “The Library Bar” to learn more about Susan’s passion for talent acquisition and her love of cooking!

Thanks to T.J., Ernst & Young and Susan San Martin for a very powerful evening of professional development.

Jan. 25th Event Summary: “Foot-in-the-Door Job Seeking Practices” Co-hosted by IABC-LA & IABC-USC Chapters

IABC-USC Executive Board (From L-R)Lauren Schultz, Xiaochu Hu, Moqi Liu, Ashley Michaud. Carolyn Ray, Daniela Arellano, IABC-LA Board Members: Cheryl Farrell and T.J. Stevko

(L-R:) IABC-USC Executive Board: Lauren Schultz, Xiaochu Hu, Moqi Liu, Ashley Michaud, Carolyn Ray, Daniela Arellano; IABC-LA Board Members: Cheryl Farrell and T.J. Stevko

Lilli Cloud, Blue Feet, and Susan San Martin, Plan B Communications at USC. 

Lilli Cloud of Blue Feet, and Susan San Martin, Plan B Communications guide IABC-USC students towards successful job-seeking strategies.   

Written by: Cheryl Farrell

In a fine example of partnership to inform IABC members, two local chapters co-hosted a hiring practices seminar for early entrants into the communications marketplace. IABC-LA and IABC-USC (University of Southern California) joined to garner student-focused advice from two experts in the field of recruitment and personal communications branding.

Gathered at the USC Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism’s Cowan Auditorium, approximately 35 communications students, recent graduates, IABC-LA members, and Annenberg staff heard insightful responses to questions previously submitted to the speakers. Lively in their presentations, Lilli Cloud, Founder and Principal, Blue Feet and Susan San Martin, Principal, Plan B Communications shared their wisdom from a combined 40 years of experience helping hundreds of clients. Some surprising “do’s and don’ts” drew gasps from the audience.

Social Media and Online Resources
• “Cleanse your Facebook”—be aware that social media tools are actively used by hiring managers to obtain information that does not appear on a prospective hire’s application.

• Do not shy away from using social media pages because, as a communications expert, you are expected to know how to best use it in your respective professions.

• Research prospective employers—visit company websites for mission and values statements, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) reports, as well as private blogs about corporate culture. 

• LinkedIn and are highly recommended online resources for finding jobs.

Lilli Cloud, Founder and Principal, Blue Feet (left) and Susan San Martin, Principal, Plan B Communications  Networking Resources
• A highly recommended book about networking, “paying it forward,” and being generous with your time is “Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time,” by Keith Ferrazzi. [ISBN-10:0385512058] Offer to help others as you ask them to help you find employment.

• Volunteering, internships, and alumni associations are excellent sources of contacts. Approximately 80% of interns find fulltime employment at the companies where they volunteer.

• The Los Angeles Business Journal is another good resource.

• For international students, local consulates are helpful with contacts and other resources.

Resume and Interview Do’s and Don’ts
• Do not use “Objectives” on résumés. It is an outdated and self-focused statement. Instead, use a well crafted three-sentence summary of skills focused on how you can help a prospective employer meet its goals.

• Remember presentation—lots of white space and bullet points are best. There are so many applicants for every job that employers will not use time to wade through dense copy.

  • For new job entrants, the summary should be “aspirational” as opposed to inspirational. Send the message about what you would like to do for a company versus the practice of more seasoned professionals who inspire the reader with what they’ve done and can bring to an organization.

• Prepare to answer “softball” questions as well as dreaded questions in an interview. Be in control of your branding by preparing for the easy and tough questions.

• Integrity and honesty—while certain verbs can enhance the level of participation on a project, do not lie! A colorful example was cited that demonstrates how years of strong work experience can be eclipsed by blatant misstatement of facts.

The event co-moderator and co-chair was the talented and resourceful IABC-USC president, Carolyn Ray (M.A., 2010). Assisting her was an enthusiastic student board of directors. Inspired by an IABC-LA hiring practices event in November 2009, two IABC-LA board members co-chaired with Carolyn Ray in planning today’s event:  T.J. Stevko, Communications Specialist, Mercer (also co-moderator) and Cheryl Farrell, independent communications professional.

IABC-LA members, Chris Cabrera, Corporate Communications Project Manager, Southern California Edison and Ariela Iringan, Manager, Deloitte Consulting joined students for networking after the event.

Today’s hiring practices was well-received and similar co-hosting opportunities are being considered to help the Los Angeles and USC chapter meet membership objectives.

(L-R) Lilli Cloud, Susan San Martin, Cheryl Farrell and T.J. Stevko
“It was inspiring to attend the event at USC, and I was very impressed with the students. You could see some trends, based on the questions they asked. For example, many of them asked about corporate social responsibility, and I was able to share the good things my company is doing to help protect the environment, develop alternative forms of power, reach out to the community and help customers conserve energy. These students are the leaders of the (near) future, and it’s great to see where they want to focus their careers. And speaking of energy, they have lots of it.”

Chris Cabrera
Communications Project Manager
Past-President, IABC-LA

Nov. 12 Event Summary: “Hiring Practices: What Communications Professionals Should Know”

IABC-LA’s Paula Cassin and Cheryl Farell, Panelist Moderator, with Jay Berger, Pamela Jones and Lilli CloudOn November 12, 2009, Cheryl Farrell, IABC-LA Board Member and Chair, Regional Events, served as Panel Moderator for three distinguished panelists who not only engaged 30 member participants, but also helped attendees recalibrate search efforts in this distinctively tough job market.  While you may be “analytical,” “strategic,” and “organized” according to your resume, those attributes are simply not enough to obtain an interview…yet gaining clarity on what works and what doesn’t will help place you on the top of the interview pile.

Cheryl and attendees welcomed:  Jay Berger, PhD, Manager Partner, Morris & Berger (, whose boutique executive search firm finds senior level execs for non-profit clients; Pamela Jones, Senior Recruiter, The Walt Disney Company, who is responsible for full life-cycle recruitment in Production, Marketing, Studio Operations, and more; and Lilli Cloud, Founder & Principal, Blue Feet Communications, who helps entrepreneurs and job seekers develop their personal brand (

The combination of prepared and audience questions and expert panelists’ answers covered what’s-on-our-minds topics ranging from the top three elements found in successful placements to overcoming an applicant’s impediments to becoming a job-seeker entrepreneur.

Here are some strong suggestions from Jay, Pamela, and Lilli regarding key topics:

Resumes, Cover Letters and Personal Branding:
• Jay: chronological and 2-4 pages ideal (1-page resumes can be frustrating for a senior level recruiter!). No gimmicks, no photos. No generic cover letters.
• Pamela: Keep it simple. “Interests” not necessary. Pay attention to the job description and have searchable terms that you can back up in an interview.
• Lilli: Become a job-seeker entrepreneur. Consulting is replacing many jobs, so do both job search and consulting.  Hang your personal branded website shingle. A professional head shot is crucial to be taken seriously. Raise your visability through social networking yet get out of your house physically and to make those in-person contacts.

Secrets to Successful Placements:
• Jay: On-line applying is here to stay. Send cover and resume as an attachment.  Word-of-mouth snowball approach works.
• Pamela: Understand and speak to the job you are applying for vs. “I always loved Disney as a child”!  Be prepared with job-specific examples as opposed to canned responses. Do research on the company prior to interview…take the old school approach.
• Lilli: Be prepared to answer the toughest questions that you may normally want to avoid in an interview regarding your experience (e.g. not finishing school, gap in employment)

And More…
• Personal branding means presenting “the you on your very best day.”
• Plan to stay with a company at least for 2-3 years
• Employers can see where you have been applying; so keep your search focused
• Non-profits will consolidate marketing and communications professionals into one role: “Institutional Relations”…excellent opportunities for good writers; grant writers.
• Give as much as you get from a networking contact (ex. Share an interesting article or something of value to them.)
• Volunteer at non-profits…towards a full-time position.

And finally…”Be Encouraged. Network. Demonstrate (Show Don’t Tell).”

The early morning breakfast event simply would not have been possible without the Calabasas headquarters location of The ALS Association generously provided by fellow IABC members, Jeff Snyder and Greg Cash. This event was also attended by Career Transitions Now members, led by Douglas Whitaker.

Due to the vibrant success of “Hiring Practices,” for those IABC-LA members who missed this opportunity, the event is being coordinated for a January presentation at USC’s Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism. So start networking!

Lilli Cloud of Blue Feet Communications discusses personal branding towards getting work

Participants learned hiring practices’ secrets to being a successful job seeker

November 12: Pre-Event Summary: “Hiring Practices”

IABC-LA Regional Meeting, Calabasas Hills
 “Hiring Practices: What Communications Professionals Should Know”
Thursday, November 12, 2009
8AM – 10AM
Three Distinguished Panelists/Cheryl Farrell, Moderator

Posted by: Cheryl Farrell
If you had the chance to ask a tenured hiring practices expert any question, what would it be? What if you had the opportunity to sit across the table from a managing director of a major recruitment firm that specializes in non-profit executive placements? Or, how about chatting with a senior recruiter of a major entertainment conglomerate? Finally, what-if you can ask a personal branding expert about the essentials of a compelling branding statement?

All this will be available to you at the November 12 IABC-LA professional development meeting. Thanks to the generosity of fellow IABC members, Jeff Snyder and Greg Cash of The ALS Association, the event will be held at the association’s Calabasas Hills headquarters.

As moderator for the event, I have the privilege of preparing questions for our distinguished panel. Here is a sample, and I welcome your questions.

1. Please describe the top two or three themes you find in your successful placements. [E.g., résumé quality, word-of-mouth referrals, use of social networking]

2. On the matter of hiring practices from earlier times, what is your opinion about online applications versus hard-copy submissions? What about following the rules in the “don’t call us, we’ll call you” instruction?

3. Please describe the top two or three impediments you find in your applicant base and how can applicants overcome them.

4. For new entrants in the hiring marketplace, what is the best strategy to distinguish oneself from others with similar credentials? 

5. What does it mean to be a job seeker-entrepreneur? How important are job seekers’ communications skills to increase the chances of being hired?

Register for the event that is sure to provide valuable information on current hiring practices and employment options.

To register, go to to “Upcoming Events.” Click on November 12th event then click registration link.

The ALS Association
27001 Agoura Road, Suite 250
Calabasas Hills, CA 91301
Thursday, November 12, 2009
8AM – 10AM
Members: $30
Non-Members: $40

Price includes light breakfast. Door prizes courtesy of the IABC Knowledge Centre. Free parking. Limited seating.

Jay Berger, PhD, Managing Partner, Morris & Berger
Twenty-two years experience as principal with Morris & Berger, a boutique executive search firm working on senior level searches, exclusively for nonprofit clients.

Pamela Jones, Senior Recruiter, The Walt Disney Company
More than a decade of corporate recruiter experience, responsible for full life-cycle recruitment in the areas of Production, Marketing, Studio Operations, Home Entertainment, Distribution and Music.

Lilli Cloud, Founder & Principal, Blue Feet Communications
Communications veteran of 20+ years, Lilli helps entrepreneurs and job seekers develop their personal brand and articulate that both verbally and in writing, in a clear, compelling way that makes them stand out from the crowd. Visit

Panel Moderator: Cheryl Farrell, IABC Board Member and Chair, Regional Events
An award-winning communicator with a career that spans broadcast media to corporate banking. As a volunteer, she writes and speaks on behalf of advocacy organizations such as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

The ALS Association Hosts
Jeff Snyder, Vice President, Communications
Greg Cash, Director, Communications