Why IABCLA?

It’s membership month at IABC. If you’re interested in building your career and your network, and meeting innovative and established communicators in the LA area – IABCLA is for you. And this month you can join or renew your membership at a 10 percent discount.

I joined IABC 15 years ago when I transitioned from writer and video producer to communicator. IABC provided the resources, the contacts, and professional certification that established me in the profession. My IABC volunteer assignments expanded my horizons globally. When I moved to Switzerland, IABC was a network and safety net in a new cultural environment.

What’s in it for you?

In addition to events and programs in LA, IABC membership puts you in touch with communicators around the world and gives you access to research, newsletters, and thought leaders as well as job postings and an online directory of more than 1,000 members worldwide.

Find out what we’re up to at IABCLA.

Join Now!

-Deborah Hudson, President

Communications case study: Responding to a CEO’s potentially unethical demands

By IABCLA President Deborah Hudson

Ethics. My thoughts about ethics are pretty simple and direct. I have a strong moral bent and can tell the difference between right and wrong. When I encounter ethical issues I quickly find a clear, specific response. I thought that covered the bases.

But IABCLA colleague Cheryl Farrell opened my eyes. When we met with a handful of other members to dine and discuss “Communications Ethics in the era of ‘alternative facts,’” she said, “I think there’s always an ethical issue. Whenever human beings are involved, there’s conflict.”

And the discussion proved her point.

Case study: A CEO’s demand for employee names

Cheryl posed a case study based loosely on the changing fortunes of a communications giant: massive layoffs, followed by the CEO’s resignation and conviction on fraud. Employees faced insecurity, a loss of control and disillusionment in a corporation that they were once proud of.

The new CEO introduced himself and his new direction during a town hall, but was surprised by tough and confrontational questioning from employees.  The CEO shut down discussion, then demanded the names of questioners from the Communications department.

What is the ethical response?

5 responses to questionable ethics from the CEO

It turns out that everyone at the table that night had a different ethical resolution:

1: Build the CEO’s connections with the employees

One said, “I’d agree and set up a lunch for the CEO to sit down and talk to the employees whose names he asked for so he could get beyond the bitterness and see their sense of ownership and engagement.”

2: Advise the CEO on legal issues

Another suggested that it might be time to consult Compliance and would be important to counsel the CEO about legal protections for whistleblowers.

3: Advise the CEO to listen more before acting

A third suggested reframing the demand in communications terms – pointing to other CEO communications transitions – suggesting taking the high road of listening before launching new plans.

4: Ask the CEO why he wanted the names

Another person at the table suggested asking the CEO why he was asking for names in order to understand his intentions and try to speak to his underlying needs.

5: Wait

After tempers cool, ask the CEO how he wants to respond to the questions at the town hall.

Hearing the different approaches broadened everyone’s perspective. For me, it was a profound learning moment in the complexity of ethics: there’s more than one right answer.

Internal communicators: Holding the middle ground

All of these responses speak to the role of internal communicators today: We sit on this shaky ground between employees and executives, trying to serve both while ensuring ethical behavior and doing what’s best for the business.

A strong ethical foundation can make the internal communicator’s in-between ground more firm, but it doesn’t make these types of challenges any easier.

Based on the responses from peers around the table I see a simple checklist for those moments when we need to engage with an executive around an ethically challenging demand:

  1. Do your research on the legal implications
  2. Ask the executive why he’s made the demand
  3. Look for a way to show the human side of the issue
  4. Find a way to help the executive listen more to employees
  5. Help the executive connect with employees

This simple checklist can turn an ethical perspective into actionable next steps. Responding quickly from an ethical center is more important than ever In these days of “alternative facts,” viral videos and rushed judgments.

Employees and executives both need us.

So, if you were facing the situation in this case study, what would you do?

Event Recap: Nine & Dine Discussion About Ethics in the Age of Alternative Facts

Six LA communicators gathered around the dinner table in Venice March 31 to share experiences and challenge each other on how ethics play a role in our professional lives. As one diner said, “we have a balancing act inside us.”

The discussion focused mostly on internal communications, reviewing ethical issues inherent in leadership, as well as corporate culture, change management and organizational strategy. The group’s discussion continually circled around the idea that internal communicators, especially, play a variety of roles all at once. While they help executives and organizational leaders drive change, they also are like the nerve networks of the human body, bringing signals in from all the extremities to inform the central brain.

Cheryl Farrell (Internal Communications Manager at RAND Corporation), who facilitated the conversation, posed a “lightning round” where individuals posed solutions to a short case study. Six participants contributed six unique solutions.

IABCLA’s new VP for Communications, Ephraim Freed, summed up the discussion at the end of the night saying: “internal communicators are advisers to executives, champions of employees and bastions of truth and ethics.”

IABCLA members and those interested in IABC can look out for our next Nine & Dine event, which will focus on the topic of diversity and take place in downtown Los Angeles.

Leadership Institute Volunteer Opportunities List

The Los Angeles and Orange County chapter members are being called on to form a Hospitality Task Force for the IABC Leadership Institute conference in Long Beach this February, 4-6. Several exclusive volunteer opportunities are available within this committee  for those wishing to be part of an international event while demonstrating leadership skills.

VOLUNTEER LEADER POSITIONS:

  • Hospitality Committee CO-CHAIRS: One member from Los Angeles and one member from Orange County chapters, preferably past chapter leaders. This position(s) will:
    • Name the three positions on the Hospitality Task Force for the Leadership Institute and ensure that they understand their roles:
      • Volunteer coordinator
      • Hospitality coordinator
      • Dine-around coordinator
    • Set up regular meetings of the Hospitality Task Force and establishing a reporting structure to track progress
    • Communicate important information from staff to other task force members
  • Volunteer Coordinator:
    • Recruit 10-15 core volunteers to hep staff registration, hospitality and dine-around tables.
      • These volunteer staff positions are to be organized in shifts for a total of 2-5 hours throughout the LI conference.
    • Assign volunteer schedules at least two week prior to LI and provide instructions about responsibilities
    • Provide IABC staff liaison with a schedule that lists volunteer names, contact information and schedule.
    • Working with the Dine-Around Coordinator to recruit a dine-around host for each of the dine-around restaurants and provides direction for their assignment.
    • Working with Hospitality Coordinator, recruiting volunteers to lead the hospitality activities on Thursday/Friday of the LI conference.
    • With the hospitality and dine-around coordinators, recruit volunteers to staff the hospitality and dine-around tables over four days of the LI conference.
  • Hospitality Coordinator: The Hospitality Team is largely responsible for making sure that the conference’s social programs not only capture the international culture of the association, but also the spirit of the host city and region. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Manage the staffing and setup of a hospitality table onsite to introduce visitors to the host city, including where conference attendees can get information about restaurants, city tours, points of interest and other must-sees.
    • May develop a resource list of city restaurants, attractions and information to help familiarize attendees with the city.
    • Obtains hospitality tale materials such as city maps, transportation information and coupons (if possible).
  • Dine-Around Coordinator: The Friday-evening dine-around, coordinated entirely by the local chapters (LA and OC), has proven to to be of the highlights of the Leadership Institute. The dine-around provides participants with an opportunity to network with one another in a relaxed, informal setting and to enjoy one of the city’s restaurants while learning more about local city. Chapter volunteers serve as hosts at this “pay your own way” dinner. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Coordinate Friday evening dinners to approximately 10 local restaurants.
    • Identify restaurants in a range of cuisines and budgets, make reservations prior to the conference, and reconfirm all reservations on the day of the event.
    • Develop individual restaurant sign-up sheets with sample menus, cost information, and other key restaurant info for the dine-around table at the conference.
    • Works with volunteers to manage sign-ups at the dine-around table at the conference, Thursday-Friday
    • Identifies and recruits volunteers (dine-around hosts) to lead dinner groups on Friday evening. Provides instructions to the hosts.
    • Designs and prints a dine-around guide for onsite distribution at the conference and/or posts dine-around information on chapter websites prior to the conference.

 

SUPPORT VOLUNTEER POSITIONS

CMP Exam Proctor(s): The Communication Management Professional certification exam is to take place on Thursday during the conference. It is preferred that one male and one female volunteer to be present to sit in for this exam, as proctors must escort test-takers to the restroom if needed, in order to eliminate any opportunity for cheating. There will be a 20-30-minute training session provided to the proctors for the exam.

Core Volunteers: 10-15 volunteers to receive LI registrations and participate in the following duties:

  • Provide support at IABC registration desks to welcome attendees and distribute conference badges and materials
  • Checking badges at general session doors
  • Staffing the following two tables:
    • Hospitality Table. The volunteers who staff this table provide attendees with info about restaurants, points or interest and other must-sees. They will host a table with city guides, maps and other visitor info. Hospitality Table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Dine-Around Table. The volunteers who staff this table assist attendees in sign-up for the Friday dine-around restaurants. Familiarity with restaurants on the list is an asset. Dine-around table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Note: Hospitality and Dine-Around tables may be combined into one table for this event.

Dine-Around Hosts to act as hosts for dinner groups on Friday evening during the dine-around at local restaurants. These volunteers ensure their entire group is assembled and assist the group in traveling to the restaurant by taxis, public transportation, or by foot. All dinner attendees pay for their own meals and transportation to the restaurant. Local chapter current members are preferred. These volunteers do not receive a complimentary LI registration.

 

INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS

IABC will arrange and assist in the delivery of onsite training at the hotel for all volunteers within the week prior to the conference.

The hospitality task force benefits from the opportunity to promote chapter activities and membership to attendees. Further, volunteers have the chance to network with other chapters’ members and demonstrate leadership within the chapter.

IABC’s conference budget does not include funds for any additional initiatives that the hospitality task force may choose to develop. Any initiative that the task force may wish to pursue should first be discussed with the IABC conference staff to ensure that it is in line with programming and sponsorship goals as set forth by the Program Advisory Committee and IABC, and the task force understands that it is responsible for all associated expenses.

Leadership Institute Volunteer Opportunities List

The Los Angeles and Orange County chapter members are being called on to form a Hospitality Task Force for the IABC Leadership Institute conference in Long Beach this February, 4-6. Several exclusive volunteer opportunities are available within this committee  for those wishing to be part of an international event while demonstrating leadership skills.

VOLUNTEER LEADER POSITIONS:

  • Hospitality Committee CO-CHAIRS: One member from Los Angeles and one member from Orange County chapters, preferably past chapter leaders. This position(s) will:
    • Name the three positions on the Hospitality Task Force for the Leadership Institute and ensure that they understand their roles:
      • Volunteer coordinator
      • Hospitality coordinator
      • Dine-around coordinator
    • Set up regular meetings of the Hospitality Task Force and establishing a reporting structure to track progress
    • Communicate important information from staff to other task force members
  • Volunteer Coordinator:
    • Recruit 10-15 core volunteers to hep staff registration, hospitality and dine-around tables.
      • These volunteer staff positions are to be organized in shifts for a total of 2-5 hours throughout the LI conference.
    • Assign volunteer schedules at least two week prior to LI and provide instructions about responsibilities
    • Provide IABC staff liaison with a schedule that lists volunteer names, contact information and schedule.
    • Working with the Dine-Around Coordinator to recruit a dine-around host for each of the dine-around restaurants and provides direction for their assignment.
    • Working with Hospitality Coordinator, recruiting volunteers to lead the hospitality activities on Thursday/Friday of the LI conference.
    • With the hospitality and dine-around coordinators, recruit volunteers to staff the hospitality and dine-around tables over four days of the LI conference.
  • Hospitality Coordinator: The Hospitality Team is largely responsible for making sure that the conference’s social programs not only capture the international culture of the association, but also the spirit of the host city and region. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Manage the staffing and setup of a hospitality table onsite to introduce visitors to the host city, including where conference attendees can get information about restaurants, city tours, points of interest and other must-sees.
    • May develop a resource list of city restaurants, attractions and information to help familiarize attendees with the city.
    • Obtains hospitality tale materials such as city maps, transportation information and coupons (if possible).
  • Dine-Around Coordinator: The Friday-evening dine-around, coordinated entirely by the local chapters (LA and OC), has proven to to be of the highlights of the Leadership Institute. The dine-around provides participants with an opportunity to network with one another in a relaxed, informal setting and to enjoy one of the city’s restaurants while learning more about local city. Chapter volunteers serve as hosts at this “pay your own way” dinner. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Coordinate Friday evening dinners to approximately 10 local restaurants.
    • Identify restaurants in a range of cuisines and budgets, make reservations prior to the conference, and reconfirm all reservations on the day of the event.
    • Develop individual restaurant sign-up sheets with sample menus, cost information, and other key restaurant info for the dine-around table at the conference.
    • Works with volunteers to manage sign-ups at the dine-around table at the conference, Thursday-Friday
    • Identifies and recruits volunteers (dine-around hosts) to lead dinner groups on Friday evening. Provides instructions to the hosts.
    • Designs and prints a dine-around guide for onsite distribution at the conference and/or posts dine-around information on chapter websites prior to the conference.

 

SUPPORT VOLUNTEER POSITIONS

CMP Exam Proctor(s): The Communication Management Professional certification exam is to take place on Thursday during the conference. It is preferred that one male and one female volunteer to be present to sit in for this exam, as proctors must escort test-takers to the restroom if needed, in order to eliminate any opportunity for cheating. There will be a 20-30-minute training session provided to the proctors for the exam.

Core Volunteers: 10-15 volunteers to receive LI registrations and participate in the following duties:

  • Provide support at IABC registration desks to welcome attendees and distribute conference badges and materials
  • Checking badges at general session doors
  • Staffing the following two tables:
    • Hospitality Table. The volunteers who staff this table provide attendees with info about restaurants, points or interest and other must-sees. They will host a table with city guides, maps and other visitor info. Hospitality Table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Dine-Around Table. The volunteers who staff this table assist attendees in sign-up for the Friday dine-around restaurants. Familiarity with restaurants on the list is an asset. Dine-around table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Note: Hospitality and Dine-Around tables may be combined into one table for this event.

Dine-Around Hosts to act as hosts for dinner groups on Friday evening during the dine-around at local restaurants. These volunteers ensure their entire group is assembled and assist the group in traveling to the restaurant by taxis, public transportation, or by foot. All dinner attendees pay for their own meals and transportation to the restaurant. Local chapter current members are preferred. These volunteers do not receive a complimentary LI registration.

 

INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS

IABC will arrange and assist in the delivery of onsite training at the hotel for all volunteers within the week prior to the conference.

The hospitality task force benefits from the opportunity to promote chapter activities and membership to attendees. Further, volunteers have the chance to network with other chapters’ members and demonstrate leadership within the chapter.

IABC’s conference budget does not include funds for any additional initiatives that the hospitality task force may choose to develop. Any initiative that the task force may wish to pursue should first be discussed with the IABC conference staff to ensure that it is in line with programming and sponsorship goals as set forth by the Program Advisory Committee and IABC, and the task force understands that it is responsible for all associated expenses.

IABC Leadership Institute in Long Beach this February

Take advantage of the LI Conference’s exclusive volunteer opportunities or register for the CMP Certification exam.

IABC’s Los Angeles and Orange County chapters are proud to host the IABC Leadership Institute Conference February 4-6, 2016, in Long Beach. Over 100 attendees from around the world will be visiting our area to share best practices, refine ideas and build relationships.

Even if you don’t currently occupy a leadership position with IABC, there is still opportunity for you to be involved i making this event a success. The Los Angeles and Orange County chapters will form a Hospitality Committee to facilitate registration, networking, and proctoring the CMP Certification exam.

This committee will:

  • Organize the Dine-Around
  • Host a welcome/resource table
  • Provide an exam proctor for the CMP Certification exam (details below)
  • Recruit volunteers

We are looking for one member from IABC-LA to join an Orange County member in co-chairing this Hospitality Committee. IABC will arrange and assist in the delivery of onsite training at the hotel for all volunteers within the week prior to the conference.

Here’s your chance to be part of an international event while networking and demonstrating leadership skills. Contact communications-vp@iabcla.com if you are interested in volunteering in any of the above areas. (More detailed volunteer position information will be posted soon.)

 


 

COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL (CMP) CERTIFICATION

During the LI Conference we will be offering the CMP Certification exam on Thursday, Feb. 4. Candidates that successfully complete the application process developed by the Global Communication Certification Council will be eligible to register for the exam. Keep these important dates in mind:

  • Jan. 4: Application deadline for PRIORITY consideration for the Feb. 4 exam date
  • Jan. 22: Deadline for candidates to register for the October exam
  • Feb. 4: Exam administration

For more information and access to the certification handbook and application, visit the CMP Certification page. For questions regarding the GCCC, contact Sara Fowdy, Ed. D. at GCCC@iabc.com.

October Means Membership Discounts. Top 10 Reasons to Join or Renew!

Belonging to a professional organization is more than just a resumé booster—it can enrich your entire career. And in this large, diverse, metropolitan area of Los Angeles, it’s a real treat to schmooze with other communicators and get to know what’s going on behind the scenes at other organizations. Plus, IABC-LA’s monthly webinar series offers chances to learn a thing-er-two or showcase your own strategies and experiences.

October is IABC’s Membership Month, which offers 10% off international dues and will waive the $40 application fee. Current IABC members who recruit new members are also eligible to win a 2016 World Conference Registration Package.

And in honor of Membership Month, here’s a little reminder of what a professional organization can do for you:

Top 10 Reasons to Join a Professional Organization

posted by 4CTechnologies

  1. Broaden your knowledge: Professional organizations sometimes offer courses, seminars and/or lectures to keep themselves and their members up to date on the latest industry innovations, research and trends. Staying informed on your industry’s trends will only help you in the long run and will put you one step ahead of the competition!

    2. Take charge of your career: Take advantage of career resources. Associations often have job listings online or in print available only to their members. This is a great way to find targeted job postings for your area of interest.

    3. Build a better resume: Many organizations have career resources available such as tips on effective resumes or cover letter writing. Listing your association membership on your resume is impressive to current or future employers as it shows that you are dedicated to staying connected in your profession.

    4. Enhance your network: We all know that networking is key for the movers and shakers of the community! Making connections is critical, and joining associations give countless opportunities to connect on a local and sometimes even global level. For most people, creating professional relationships is important, and joining a group allows you to have a sense of security and trust. From this, you are able to support and help one another in reaching your professional goals.

    5. Be a Leader: Professional associations give you an opportunity to develop your skills as a leader, and this is important not only for your personal growth, but for your growth in your firm.

    6. Become a mentor: Giving back can be the greatest reward and benefit. Participating in forums, chat groups or discussion boards sponsored by an association is also a great way to grow your network. This allows you to use your peers as sounding boards and often make some great friends with the same interests as you.

    7. Make a new friend: Once we graduate from school, we all know how hard it is to get out and meet new people and make a new friend! Use professional networking groups as an opportunity to escape the norm and meet new people that may give you a reason to come out of your shell a bit more and have fun.

    8. Give back to the community: There are plenty of organizations that coordinate socially conscious initiatives to support community efforts. Whether it is a nearby animal shelter or a food drive for a local charity, there are sure to be plenty of options for you to choose for if you are looking to give back.

    9. Strength in Numbers: We live in a day and age where establishing a presence in any given career field often demands working long hours in the office and bringing work home when the doors close. At the end of the day, you may have ideas for cultivating partnerships, yet not feel up to shouldering all the responsibility to organize them. In a community organization, you have access to an established support system of experienced people who are motivated to get things done. The battle is half-won!

    10. Stay Inspired and Stay Motivated: Learn to love what you do! You may not even know that you love something, but it’s important to be proactive about things you discover on the journey. Join a professional organization and discover something new TODAY!

IABC-LA elects 2015-16 Board of Directors

The votes are in! Members of IABC Los Angeles have elected the chapter’s Board of Directors for 2015-16:

nick mike nicole leslie

Nick Duggan

President

Mike Spasoff

Immediate Past President
& Webmaster

Nicole Maury

Past President & Treasurer

Leslie Dodson

Vice President, Social Media

The 2015-16 fiscal year begins on July 1, 2015. We look forward to continuing to serve as your chapter board – thank you for your support!

If you are interested in volunteering to support the IABC-LA chapter, please contact us at communications-vp@iabcla.com.

August Update

A little over a month ago I shared the state of our chapter and asked for help from our membership to fill some open positions. Despite being distracted by some truly lovely weather here in Los Angeles we got a fantastic response and I’m happy to be able to announce new additions to our board and some great progress on event planning.

Leslie Dodson will be joining us as VP, Social Media and Nick Duggan has agreed to join our board as VP, Communications. I’m excited about the talent and skills each of them bring to these roles; and you’ll learn more about them in upcoming messages. Until then please join me in welcoming them to our board. Several IABC Los Angeles members also wrote in to volunteer to assist with local events. We look forward to developing these opportunities and will announce them both in email and on our website.

This is great progress and a testament to the can-do spirit of our diverse membership. However, we can – and will – do more. We still have open board positions and would welcome anybody interested in volunteering in any capacity.

IABC Los Angeles state of the chapter

President’s message, July 2014

I’d like to welcome everyone to our IABC Los Angeles 2014-2015 board year. I’m filled with excitement at both the opportunities and challenges our organization faces. But before I get ahead of myself, I really must thank our previous board members. Their support and dedication brought our membership together for some amazing events and great networking opportunities. Thank You!

Meet your new IABC Los Angeles board

  • Mike Spasoff, President
  • Nicole Maury, Past President
  • Gerhard Runken, VP, Membership (through Sept)
  • Dustin Alipour, VP, Events
  • Open Positions
    • VP, Membership (Sept. 2014 – June 2015)
    • VP, Finance
    • VP, Communications
    • VP, Social Media
    • Event and Membership Volunteers

Meeting the challenge

These are challenging times, both for our organization as well as our chapter. Professional organizations as a whole are struggling, and IABC is no different. For those of you who attended World Conference, or follow the discussions on LinkedIn the challenges at the international level are clear – as is the work being done to chart a path forward. In this message, however, I’d like to focus on the specific challenges faced by our chapter, as well as my plans to address them.

Volunteers needed!

Our chapter is an all-volunteer organization. Every chapter-run activity happens because someone steps up to make it happen. Because we are a volunteer-run organization, resources have always been in short supply. In the past, board volunteers have supplemented open volunteer roles and event schedules have been reduced as needed. This year is different. We have four unfilled board positions and many vacant volunteer opportunities. Put simply, we have just enough board members to cover the minimum commitments required to be a chapter within IABC.

One way forward would be to continue on our current path and simply ask our smaller board to do even more to maintain the status-quo – hoping that we could eventually fill the positions and return to normal. I think this is short-sighted though, and ultimately will only make the problem worse.

A sustainable plan

Given our lack of resources, our approach will be to significantly reduce or restructure our chapter activities and focus existing board resources on the long-term health of our chapter. Specifically, we will devote our major efforts to filling our open board and volunteer positions and developing a repeatable process for sustaining volunteerism within our chapter.

Below you will find a chart describing a new “lite-mode” operating model for our chapter. The reductions and changes are targeted to maintain what we feel is important in each of these areas while making time for the long-term improvements the board must undertake.

Previous operations Lite-mode
Financial reporting(a fixed requirement from international)
  • Monthly financial review and budgeting
  • Annual tax preparation and reporting
No change
Board meetings
  • Monthly online meetings
  • Two annual in-person meetings
  • As-needed in-person meetings before or after events
All online meetings
Member newsletter Monthly newsletter containing a feature article and relevant links A monthly president’s message
Membership renewal messages Personal phone call from the VP of Membership A personal email from a board member
Membership anniversary messages Personal phone call from the VP of Membership
  • A personal email from a board member
  • Recognition within our social media channels
Events
  • Monthly in-person events, alternating between panel discussions and networking
  • Annual keynote
  • Annual holiday party
  • Promotion of international and regional online events
  • Promotion of international and regional online events
  • Monthly Google hangouts to discuss “lessons learned”
  • In-person events, only if a volunteer from the chapter is willing to lead the event. The chapter will cover standard costs.
Social Media
  • Promotion of chapter events
  • Promotion of international and regional online events
  • Sharing content produced by the chapter
  • Topics of interest to or about Communicators
  • Promotion of international and regional online events
  • Sharing content produced by the chapter
  • Topics of interest to or about Communicators
  • Membership anniversary messages

 

What hasn’t changed

IABC International is undergoing a transformation and you can see the signs of this change in the newly improved Communication World as well as the newly formed IABC Academy. These changes may bring uncertainty but through it all IABC is still the premier organization for business communicators, and IABC Los Angeles continues to be a group of diverse storytellers doing incredible work for remarkable organizations. Your board is still dedicated to serving the membership of our chapter, and we sincerely believe that the changes I’ve outlined above will sustain us and build an even stronger chapter in the long term. We are, and will always be, your board – accountable to you and eager to hear your feedback.

If you want to take part in transforming our organization, or suggest a different solution, please reach out to me or other board members. My contact information, along with the rest of our board, is available on our website.

 

Vital Stats for July 2014

Membership1 new members
5 renewals this month
124 total members
Volunteers
3 current volunteers
(all board members)6 open volunteer positions
Participation19 people joined us at our last event
IABC Los Angeles is a group of diverse storytellers. We are the Los Angeles chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators – a group with 14,000 members from all around the world that join the 124 members from Los Angeles with an interest in the business of Communications.Stay up-to-date with IABC-Los Angeles
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