Victoria Dew Leads Inspiring Discussion on Entrepreneurship

 

Victoria Dew, the Founder and CEO of Dewpoint Communications, recently led a thought-provoking professional development session for IABCLA titled, “Are you an Indoor or an Outdoor Cat? The Choice of Entrepreneurship.” Dew is also Vice Chair, International Executive Board, IABC Board of Trustees.

During the discussion, Dew debunked myths about entrepreneurship. She also examined critical mindset factors for success and offered insights that inspired guests. 

“I was so proud to present this talk to IABCLA,” she said. “There are lots of opportunities for communicators to forge their own path, but it means knowing what you want and taking ownership of your career.”

To learn about Dew’s practice, please visit: dewpointcomms.com

Thank you to (W)right on Communications for sponsoring the function. 

The chapter board is now working on several fall events. Be sure to check back, as more information will be posted in the weeks ahead.

Managing Ethical Conversations at the Leadership Table

By Rob Campbell
IABCLA, Membership VP

Richard Edelman

On April 12, USC hosted its 28th Annual Kenneth Owler Smith Symposium. Richard Edelman, CEO and founder of Edelman Communications, shared his perspective on ethics and trust in communications during his keynote speech. Edelman is the creator of the Edelman Trust Barometer.

His remarks offered a host of information and thoughtful points intended to help communications leaders better manage ethical conversations at the leadership table. Here are a few highlights that may help you take action:

1. Existential challenge of trust: by understanding the media is now considered the least trusted institution globally, communications professionals can advocate for better ethical actions and ideas that change the purpose of a business.  Among media channels, social media is 40 percent less trusted than traditional methods. 

2. Employer reputation: employers are now considered the No. 1 trusted source of information after family, friends, groups, and the media. People are now withdrawing from traditional sources and expecting leadership to speak up and, as a result, businesses have the opportunity to change society.

3. Be your own media company: organizations can and should consider creating and distributing their own news and information to ensure accuracy and transparency. Doing so means owning story tone and language that can and does get modified in social and traditional media outlets. 

4. Perception gaps: be aware that among stakeholders your organization’s reputation can vary greatly, so be prepared to address partners. Reputation perception is key to solidifying and upholding your organization’s ethical status.

If your organization needs to establish ethical standards, Edelman offered the following four steps:

1. Accuracy: organizations should aim for factually and rigorously sharing information with stakeholders. 

2. Transparency: leaders should be accountable for what they promote through transparent communications that provide clarity and deliver information correctly the first time. 

3. Open Exchange: create platforms for consumers and employees that offer an opportunity for an exchange of ideas, conversation and, as needed, feedback. 

4. Ethics training: train employees at all levels about the importance of ethics and what it means to conduct business with moral responsibility.

In summary, the consensus during April’s symposium was communications is the vehicle by which an organization can lead change and be an advocate for a better community. Ethical communications can alter a business, give purpose to a brand, and can help solve societal problems.

Associate Consultant Opening

Associate Consultant Opening

PulsePoint Group in Century City is looking for a full-time Associate Consultant to work with clients primarily in the communications function.

PulsePoint, a division of ICF International, is an established management, communications, and digital consulting firm.

If have a degree in Marketing, Communications, Business or related field and one to five years experience, preferably in agency and consulting, this could be an opportunity for you.

Read the detailed job description: Pulsepoint job opening 4.18

The New Shape of Internal Communications

My fellow IABCLA board member Ephraim Freed recently wrote a blog post entitled “The iconoclast’s guide to internal communications” where he outlined best practices for internal communications. An iconoclast, we note, is “a person who attacks cherished beliefs or institutions.” Freed, the employee experience manager at Regent, L.P., encouraged me to comment on his work.

Here are my thoughts:

– Item #1: “The smasher of cherished traditions has no time for dry, boring communications that may, in fact, say nothing at all,” he wrote. “Today’s leading internal comms teams help executives tell authentic stories that show emotional vulnerability, ensure transparency around decision-making, and strive to help employees make personal connections to leaders, the brand and each other.”

The words “authentic” “vulnerability,” and “transparency” stand out. In our information age, people crave genuineness. The public is inundated with news, opinion, and marketing and its volume and ease of access can create cynicism and doubt – it’s hard to know who or what to trust. Therefore, it is vital that communications professionals help others tell authentic stories that can slice through the clutter by conveying genuineness. Leaders need to be relatable to their employees, letting them know they also face struggles in their personal and professional lives.

Freed mentions, for example, Facebook’s Cheryl Sandberg. The tech giant’s COO is an executive who embraces openness. She discussed the challenges of being a woman in the workplace in her book “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.” In addition, Sandberg chronicled her grief following the loss of her husband in “Option B: Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy.”

– Item #2: “The new internal comms team is actually an employee experience team that, in addition to multimedia communications capabilities, includes skills around UXD, research and data analysis, business process management and product management,” Freed notes. “This team also needs to be connected at the hip with technical teams that work on networking and security, sys admin, development and support.”

The words “employee experience team” resonates. As I’ve progressed in my career, I’ve come to appreciate the group dynamic and the fact that each person brings different experiences and abilities to the collective. My primary skills are PR/marketing writing and project management, and so I must rely on those who are adept in areas outside of these. One of my favorite expressions is “I know what I don’t know,” and I’m all too happy to collaborate with a colleague who possesses an expertise that I lack.

– Item #3: “In the new model internal comms plays a role of expert sherpa, helping employees at all levels identify their audiences, use optimal channels, and deliver content that meets relevant quality standards,” Freed explains.

The phrase “helping employees at all levels identify their audiences” is noticeable. It is vital to hear from people at various standings in an organization, as everyone brings value and perspective. A personal example of this is a blog entry I recently wrote for the IABCLA site
(“I Found My People in IABCLA”). The chapter’s senior leadership asked me to talk about the association from the perspective of someone who recently moved to Southern California and joined the board. They felt that as a newcomer, I would offer a fresh take on the value of involvement in the group.

To summarize, my takeaway from the Freed’s post is: the field of communications is fluid and must change with the times. Further, the best comms is authentic, team oriented, and should involve individuals at all levels of an organization. “Today the employee is the customer, the leader is a listener, and internal comms is a multidisciplinary team that facilitates connection and change,” Freed noted, and I completely agree.

Creating Engaging Content with Facebook’s Newest Update

 

We hosted our first event of 2018 on February 21! Julie Wright, president and founder of (W)right on Communications, moderated our Dine & Discuss focused on the newest Facebook algorithm changes and how that impacts brand strategy.

If you don’t already know, the Facebook algorithm, nicknamed the “friends and family update,” favors content from your friends rather than from businesses. This change pushes for businesses to pay for boosted content in order to still be seen. Although paid boosted content can be very valuable, Julie advises that there’s still a great opportunity to be seen through organic content – that is if you are creating the right kind. In order to still reach audiences amidst the algorithm change it is crucial to create content that fosters engagement, meaning content that encourages comments, conversation and sharing.

Julie shared seven tips on how to do that:

1. Avoid yes or no questions: Julie says to think of social media as a cocktail party. Asking yes or no questions at a cocktail party leaves room for a one word answer and doesn’t allow for the conversation to flourish. Instead, try to ask questions that encourage a longer response and more engagement.

2. Focus on nostalgia: This is great for unique content creation. For example, take part in #ThrowbackThursdays or #FlashbackFridays.

3. Focus on storytelling: Posts that tell a story are more engaging and interesting.

4. Feature real people: Whether this means using user generated content or posting about your company’s employees, showcasing real people and real emotions creates engaging content.

5. Use Facebook Live: Facebook Live achieves 6x the interaction than organic content. Followers are notified when a buisness goes live, encouraging more viewers to watch and engage with the video. Furthermore, the video can live on as a post on your page allowing followers to watch the video long after it was recorded. Julie advises to still prep before going live: decide on an introduction, have a focus for the video and end with a call to action.

6. See First option on Facebook: Facebook users have the ability to check off a “see first” option for a Facebook page. This guarantees that your page’s content will have priority for showing in their newsfeeds. Julie says not to be afraid to ask your followers to check off this option for your page! For example: “If you want all the latest news on our upcoming event, make sure to check off the “see first” option on our page….” More information on how to set it up is here.

7. Turn on the Audience Optimization setting: Facebook allows you to improve your organic visibility on posts by turning on this function in your settings. This allows you to target your posts to specific segments of your page’s audience based on their interests! An easy and effective tool. More information on how to use the function is here.

We want to thank Julie for the invaluable insight and to all those who could make it last night! We all enjoyed great food and even better conversations. To those who couldn’t make it, we hope the above tips will help get your social media strategy focused in the right direction!

Join us at our next IABCLA event: Coffee Connection on March 3!

I Found My People in IABCLA

By Eli Natinsky
IABCLA, Vice President of Operations

“Do you want to join the board?” IABCLA Vice President Jenny Matkovich asked me at the end of my first chapter event in November. I had the opportunity to not only meet Jenny at that first function, but several board members and chapter regulars. It was a warm and welcoming group, so it was an easy decision when I was asked to take on a leadership role.

I was already well-versed in the benefits of IABC, having been involved in the Detroit chapter. I gained a great deal from my participation – networking, friendship, professional development, educational opportunities. So, IABC was one of the first organizations I sought out when I moved from my hometown of Southeast Michigan to Los Angeles this past fall.

I’m now the vice president of operations, and my duties include taking notes during board meetings, writing up said minutes, researching and implementing internal tools such as conferencing capabilities, creating blog posts such as this, and contributing in whatever other ways are needed. It’s the first time I’ve been on the board of a professional organization, and I love it.

I took part in our board retreat in January, and it was tremendous experience. There was great energy and enthusiasm at the gathering and several programs were conceived – this includes Dine & Discuss on February 21 at TOMGEORGE and Coffee Connection on March 3 at Andante Coffee Roaster. I’m excited for both happenings, as it’s rewarding to see ideas go from inception to completion.

Being on the board has provided me entry into the LA communications world. I look forward to continuing to build relationships with other local practitioners, as well as exploring the regional comms landscape. I’m now searching for a full-time position, and my involvement in the association will likely play a part in securing me a job.

I often hear of the need to “find your people” in that it’s important to seek out like-minded individuals who appreciate you. I’m happy to say I’ve found them in IABCLA, and I encourage other communications professionals in Southern California to become involved just as I have. Thank you to Jenny and the other board members – Ephraim Freed, Deborah Hudson, Sara Laurence, Morgan Robson, Grant Skakun – for including me in their efforts to build a stronger chapter.

Ready to learn new skills and take a leadership role in a supportive environment?

IABCLA has several board openings….

… If you have web experience or would like to add WordPress to the list of skills on your resume, IABCLA needs a Director of Website (Webmaster)

… If you have the gift of gab and are interested in reaching out to communications vendors and corporations to build our partners, sponsors, IABCLA needs a VP, Sponsorships and Corporate Membership

… If you’re interested in professional development and have or want to develop skills and experience in events, IABCLA is looking for a VP, Professional Development

… If you’re a skilled networker, or someone who wants to build your LA network, IABCLA needs a VP, Membership

… If you’re detail oriented, IABCLA needs a Treasurer

To learn more, email: president@iabcla.com

Communications Specialist Opening

PCL – a top general contracting organization – is seeking an experienced Communication Specialist for the Los Angeles District office located in Glendale, California. If you have a bachelor’s degree in communications or related field, excellent skills, and the ability to work effectively under pressure in a fast-paced environment, this may be for you.

Read the detailed job profile. 

If you’re interested in applying, contact: Ana Stokley at astokley@pcl.com

Event Recap: Nine & Dine Discussion About Ethics in the Age of Alternative Facts

Six LA communicators gathered around the dinner table in Venice March 31 to share experiences and challenge each other on how ethics play a role in our professional lives. As one diner said, “we have a balancing act inside us.”

The discussion focused mostly on internal communications, reviewing ethical issues inherent in leadership, as well as corporate culture, change management and organizational strategy. The group’s discussion continually circled around the idea that internal communicators, especially, play a variety of roles all at once. While they help executives and organizational leaders drive change, they also are like the nerve networks of the human body, bringing signals in from all the extremities to inform the central brain.

Cheryl Farrell (Internal Communications Manager at RAND Corporation), who facilitated the conversation, posed a “lightning round” where individuals posed solutions to a short case study. Six participants contributed six unique solutions.

IABCLA’s new VP for Communications, Ephraim Freed, summed up the discussion at the end of the night saying: “internal communicators are advisers to executives, champions of employees and bastions of truth and ethics.”

IABCLA members and those interested in IABC can look out for our next Nine & Dine event, which will focus on the topic of diversity and take place in downtown Los Angeles.

Leadership Institute Volunteer Opportunities List

The Los Angeles and Orange County chapter members are being called on to form a Hospitality Task Force for the IABC Leadership Institute conference in Long Beach this February, 4-6. Several exclusive volunteer opportunities are available within this committee  for those wishing to be part of an international event while demonstrating leadership skills.

VOLUNTEER LEADER POSITIONS:

  • Hospitality Committee CO-CHAIRS: One member from Los Angeles and one member from Orange County chapters, preferably past chapter leaders. This position(s) will:
    • Name the three positions on the Hospitality Task Force for the Leadership Institute and ensure that they understand their roles:
      • Volunteer coordinator
      • Hospitality coordinator
      • Dine-around coordinator
    • Set up regular meetings of the Hospitality Task Force and establishing a reporting structure to track progress
    • Communicate important information from staff to other task force members
  • Volunteer Coordinator:
    • Recruit 10-15 core volunteers to hep staff registration, hospitality and dine-around tables.
      • These volunteer staff positions are to be organized in shifts for a total of 2-5 hours throughout the LI conference.
    • Assign volunteer schedules at least two week prior to LI and provide instructions about responsibilities
    • Provide IABC staff liaison with a schedule that lists volunteer names, contact information and schedule.
    • Working with the Dine-Around Coordinator to recruit a dine-around host for each of the dine-around restaurants and provides direction for their assignment.
    • Working with Hospitality Coordinator, recruiting volunteers to lead the hospitality activities on Thursday/Friday of the LI conference.
    • With the hospitality and dine-around coordinators, recruit volunteers to staff the hospitality and dine-around tables over four days of the LI conference.
  • Hospitality Coordinator: The Hospitality Team is largely responsible for making sure that the conference’s social programs not only capture the international culture of the association, but also the spirit of the host city and region. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Manage the staffing and setup of a hospitality table onsite to introduce visitors to the host city, including where conference attendees can get information about restaurants, city tours, points of interest and other must-sees.
    • May develop a resource list of city restaurants, attractions and information to help familiarize attendees with the city.
    • Obtains hospitality tale materials such as city maps, transportation information and coupons (if possible).
  • Dine-Around Coordinator: The Friday-evening dine-around, coordinated entirely by the local chapters (LA and OC), has proven to to be of the highlights of the Leadership Institute. The dine-around provides participants with an opportunity to network with one another in a relaxed, informal setting and to enjoy one of the city’s restaurants while learning more about local city. Chapter volunteers serve as hosts at this “pay your own way” dinner. The coordinator of this team will:
    • Coordinate Friday evening dinners to approximately 10 local restaurants.
    • Identify restaurants in a range of cuisines and budgets, make reservations prior to the conference, and reconfirm all reservations on the day of the event.
    • Develop individual restaurant sign-up sheets with sample menus, cost information, and other key restaurant info for the dine-around table at the conference.
    • Works with volunteers to manage sign-ups at the dine-around table at the conference, Thursday-Friday
    • Identifies and recruits volunteers (dine-around hosts) to lead dinner groups on Friday evening. Provides instructions to the hosts.
    • Designs and prints a dine-around guide for onsite distribution at the conference and/or posts dine-around information on chapter websites prior to the conference.

 

SUPPORT VOLUNTEER POSITIONS

CMP Exam Proctor(s): The Communication Management Professional certification exam is to take place on Thursday during the conference. It is preferred that one male and one female volunteer to be present to sit in for this exam, as proctors must escort test-takers to the restroom if needed, in order to eliminate any opportunity for cheating. There will be a 20-30-minute training session provided to the proctors for the exam.

Core Volunteers: 10-15 volunteers to receive LI registrations and participate in the following duties:

  • Provide support at IABC registration desks to welcome attendees and distribute conference badges and materials
  • Checking badges at general session doors
  • Staffing the following two tables:
    • Hospitality Table. The volunteers who staff this table provide attendees with info about restaurants, points or interest and other must-sees. They will host a table with city guides, maps and other visitor info. Hospitality Table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Dine-Around Table. The volunteers who staff this table assist attendees in sign-up for the Friday dine-around restaurants. Familiarity with restaurants on the list is an asset. Dine-around table hours roughly follow IABC registration hours, Thursday/Friday.
    • Note: Hospitality and Dine-Around tables may be combined into one table for this event.

Dine-Around Hosts to act as hosts for dinner groups on Friday evening during the dine-around at local restaurants. These volunteers ensure their entire group is assembled and assist the group in traveling to the restaurant by taxis, public transportation, or by foot. All dinner attendees pay for their own meals and transportation to the restaurant. Local chapter current members are preferred. These volunteers do not receive a complimentary LI registration.

 

INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS

IABC will arrange and assist in the delivery of onsite training at the hotel for all volunteers within the week prior to the conference.

The hospitality task force benefits from the opportunity to promote chapter activities and membership to attendees. Further, volunteers have the chance to network with other chapters’ members and demonstrate leadership within the chapter.

IABC’s conference budget does not include funds for any additional initiatives that the hospitality task force may choose to develop. Any initiative that the task force may wish to pursue should first be discussed with the IABC conference staff to ensure that it is in line with programming and sponsorship goals as set forth by the Program Advisory Committee and IABC, and the task force understands that it is responsible for all associated expenses.